Information about individual psychoanalytically informed psychotherapy


Psychoanalytically informed psychotherapy is a form of therapy aimed at exploring the underlying thought processes and conflicts causing emotional distress. It is based upon psychoanalytic theory and practice and takes place on a ‘one to one’ basis. Each session lasts for fifty minutes. The length of therapy may vary, depending upon the needs of the client, but in most cases will be time limited. 

An important principle of psychoanalytically informed psychotherapy is that emotional problems experienced in the present often have their origin in long-standing conflicts and relationship difficulties, which we are no longer fully aware of. Within the reliable and confidential relationship offered by the psychotherapist the client has the opportunity to explore their memories, feelings, dreams and fantasies in order to gain access to the unconscious mind and to link present difficulties with past life events.

In psychoanalytically informed psychotherapy particular attention is given to the quality of relationship established with the therapist, a relationship in which the client may re-experience past feelings and difficulties. This process is known as transference. Through exploring and resolving these formative experiences the client may arrive at a better understanding of themselves and the nature of their distress. This, in turn, may lead to positive and enduring changes in the client’s self-esteem, their current relationships and in the overall quality of their lives.


Information about individual person-centred psychotherapy


The person-centred approach is a term used to describe a model of therapy based on the work and theories of Carl Rogers. It describes the way the client and counsellor work together in the therapeutic relationship to identify the source of distress for the client and explore it together in an atmosphere of openness and without judgment.

Based on what Rogers termed the six necessary and sufficient conditions, the objective of person-centred therapy is for the counsellor to offer the client a healing relationship in which they can safely explore their difficulties.

Sometimes bringing difficult experiences and emotions out and exploring them can be distressing but you may arrive at a better understanding of yourself, your relationships with others and the nature of your distress. This, in turn, may lead to positive and enduring changes in your mental health.


Information about individual integrative therapy


Integrative Psychotherapy began to develop in the 1970’s due to a growing awareness that one clinical methodology cannot cope with every condition or provide what is needed for each individual.

Integrative psychotherapy has two strands:

Theoretical integration bringing together theories that have a consistent understanding of therapeutic change and how to facilitate it;

Facilitation of Client Integrationassisting a client to bring together previously fragmented and isolated parts of themselves into a unified whole in order to enhance their ability to live fully.

Integrative psychotherapists will use the therapeutic relationship as their framework; their personal model of theoretical integration will then depend on their own theoretical training and professional and personal experience and their clients presenting needs.

Each session lasts for fifty minutes. The length of therapy may vary, depending upon the needs of the client, but in most cases will be time limited. 

For more information please download our:

Psychodynamically Informed Psychotherapy Flyer

Person-centred Psychotherapy Therapy Flyer

Integrative Therapy Flyer

Checked/Updated 13h June 2016